two hundred and eighty-two

Master carpenters of the Finger Lakes, rejoice; for that is the number of boxes of books, mostly shelfless, that will be on a truck from Chicago to Ithaca in about a week. Although my University of Chicago email address will still work for some unknown period of time, please direct professional correspondence to me at markell@cornell.edu.

…meanwhile, back in Pick Hall…

There’s still a Spring Quarter to teach. Syllabi for “Classics of Social and Political Thought, III” and “Marx’s Capital and its Readers” are now available in the classroom.

big changes afoot

I’m excited to announce that I will be joining Cornell University’s Department of Government this summer! (I’ll update the site with new contact information when I have it.)

marx’s capital and its readers, I

The DRAFT syllabus for PLSC 44501, “Marx’s Capital and its Readers, I” is now available in the classroom and (directly) here. There may be some tinkering between now and January 4.

neoliberalism and disavowal

I’m pleased to announce that a short piece of mine responding to Wendy Brown’s Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution has been published by Theory & Event as part of a symposium that also features excellent contributions by Antonio Vázquez-Arroyo and Annie McClanahan. Since I have occasionally been known to present serious work under punny rubrics, I must on this occasion solemnly declare, with a mixture of relief and regret, that I had absolutely nothing to do with the title of the symposium.

at long last

Some papers take longer to bake than others. Six years ago, I wrote the first version of an essay on Hannah Arendt and Bertolt Brecht. I then went back to the drawing board, and back to the archives, more than once. You can now find the final result, which I hope tells a good story while also saying something theoretically interesting, at Modern Intellectual History.

for your reading pleasure

I’m pleased to announce that Security Dialogue has just published a symposium on Patricia Owens’s terrific book Economy of Force: Counterinsurgency and the Historical Rise of the Social, including comments from me and three other readers, as well as a response from Owens. If your library subscribes, you can find the whole symposium in the June 2016 issue, here.